Hiring a Handyman             Back to Page 1

Do you want the lowest price?
Do you want the Sturdiest longest lasting work?
Do you want it to look just right?
Do you want the work done really quickly?

These are some of the factors that tend to determine the cost and speed
of any particular job.   

Though I am usually happy to consult with people over the phone,  please realize that on-site consultation for smaller jobs, such as window repair,  flooring, etc... costs me time and travel money.    I will be happy to consult on site, but may charge a $70 fee.  

The same, to some extent goes for 'bids'.  If five people are bidding on a
$12,000 job, and each spending $30 in time to make those bids,  the percentage being spent on bidding is 1.25% .    If those same five people
are bidding on say a $240 screen porch repair, the percentage spend on
bids is 62.5%,  or over half.    That $150 for five bids (gas is rather expensive) does have to be paid by someone. 

The other problem with bids is that most jobs can be done several ways.
There are more expensive lock sets that are better.  One can spend a lot,
or a little time preparing a surface for painting.  Cabinets can be properly
doweled and glued or just joined.  A table can get one, or three coats of
polyurethane.   Things can be done to last a long time, or to just look ok for a while.    That is why I may choose to decline the offer of bids especially
for smaller jobs.

There are other way's to pay...

Set a 'ballpark' price and work from there.

Set a rough 'hourly rate' and base the price on that. 

Break a larger job up into small parts and negotiate the price
when each one is done based apon the value of the work done.

Or a combination of the above.   In general breaking a large job up into
smaller parts makes sense because it allows both parties to stay 'on the
same page'  and avoid disagreements.


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(*Jon's Just Handy, Handyman in Madison, WI Website Hiring a handyman section copyright implied*)